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Monday, March 16
 

8:30am

Registration Open
Monday March 16, 2020 8:30am - 5:30pm
Foyer

9:00am

9:10am

Vendor Snapshot - Synthace
Monday March 16, 2020 9:10am - 9:15am
Room Saphir

9:20am

Keynote Address: Molecules on Demand
There is a need for fresh thinking and innovative approaches to deliver higher quality drugs at a lower cost-to-market. However, the drug design process is non-deterministic, and the molecular design-make-test cycle essentially represents an adaptive stochastic search. Identification of suitable drug candidates, and the elimination of unsuitable compounds early in the discovery process provide opportinities to achieve this goal. Already, a variety of machine learning methods from the field of ‘artificial intelligence’ (AI) have been used to generate prototypical compounds with desired druglike properties and bioactivities, and to search for solutions to various scientific and technical challenges in medicinal chemistry. There is proof-of-concept for early recognition of potential side-effects, successful drug repurposing, improved accuracy for drug property predictions, and the autonomous generation of drug candidates by machine intelligence. The combination of laboratory automation and innovative software solutions for process planning and drug design promises better drug candidates, discovered and delivered faster. We will highlight opportunities and limitations of designing "molecules on demand" using machine intelligence.

Speakers
avatar for Gisbert Schneider, Ph.D.

Gisbert Schneider, Ph.D.

Professor, ETH Zurich
Gisbert Schneider is a full professor at ETH Zurich, holding the Chair for Computer-Assisted Drug Design. He is recognized as being a pioneer in the integration of machine-learning methods into practical medicinal chemistry, and for his coining the phrases ‘scaffold-hopping’ and... Read More →


Monday March 16, 2020 9:20am - 10:00am
Room Saphir

10:00am

Coffee Break in Exhibition
Monday March 16, 2020 10:00am - 10:15am
Foyer

10:15am

Supply Chain Management - How to Make a Cheap Sample Storage Consumable!
Unfortunately price often becomes a significant determining factor in selecting the sample storage consumable (tube) to use.

It is easy to make a lower cost consumable and in this presentation I will explore the compromises that take place so you have the information to make an informed decision, remembering that it's actually the consumable that remains with the sample for the life of the sample (not a consumable) and while you may change your automation, storage systems, workflows it is very unlikely you will change the consumables that your sample is already stored.

Speakers
RG

Robin Grimwood

VP & General Manager, Brooks Life Sciences
Robin is the VP & General Manager at Brooks Life Sciences, a division of Brooks Automation Inc. He joined Brooks in 2014 as part of the FluidX acquisition (co-founder and owner) and now leads the Consumables and Instruments Business Unit which comprises of consumables and Instruments... Read More →

Chairs
OP

Oliver Peter, Ph.D.

Group Leader Biology Technologies and Lead Discovery, IDORSIA Pharmaceuticals Ltd


Monday March 16, 2020 10:15am - 10:35am
Room Saphir

10:35am

Supply Chain Management - Leachables from Labware-How is it Affecting Your Science?
Compound management and modern experimental life sciences as a whole, critically depend on consumables and solvents. In this session, we want to learn more about the supply chain of these products. Most end users may be unaware of the challenges and efforts it takes to reliably deliver high quality consumable products - as long as the supply chain works well.

Speakers
LR

Lynn Rasmussen, MS

Associate Director, Southern Research
Lynn Rasmussen holds a B.S. in both Chemistry and Biology from Virginia Tech and a M.S. in Biomedical Sciences from Hood College. She has worked on Rickettsia at the University of Maryland, emerging infectious diseases at USAMRIID and Lentiviruses at the Frederick Cancer Research... Read More →

Chairs
OP

Oliver Peter, Ph.D.

Group Leader Biology Technologies and Lead Discovery, IDORSIA Pharmaceuticals Ltd


Monday March 16, 2020 10:35am - 10:55am
Room Saphir

10:55am

Supply Chain Management - Risks that Arise with Leachables from Single-Use Materials
Single-use equipment just as any other plastic material can release leachables, thus possibly affecting the efficacy and safety of the pharmaceutical drug product or may lead to invalid results in the application of analytical methods. The most serious adverse effects are caused by leachable components generated in the plastic or coated film manufacturing process, particularly during plastic extrusion and gamma sterilization. Polymers and additives (antioxidants, plasticizers, or slip agents) can degrade as a consequence of the intense energetic treatment (high temperatures or irradiation). Under process conditions, this can lead to migration of leachables from the plastic surfaces into the process fluid. For example, degradation products include the recently identified substance bis(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphate, which is a derivative of the processing stabilizer tris(2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl)phosphite (also known under the trade name IRGAFOS 168) Even very low concentrations < 1 ppm can inhibit cell growth. For single-use systems or consumables made from plastic, this usually leads to evaluations that demonstrate compatibility with the process fluids that stays in contact with the material under consideration. Therefore, an important part of qualification of single-use equipment consists of chemical safety assessment. Chemical safety means absence of leachables from the plastic material in the final product in concentrations of toxicological concern for the accordant clinical application.

Speakers
AN

Andreas Nixdorf, Ph.D.

Business Development Manager, SGS Institut Fresenius GmbH
Andreas studied organic chemistry at the University of Bielefeld in Germany with the main focus on mass spectrometry. Since the date of his PhD/doctorate in 1997, he worked in different scientific and managerial positions ranges from head of laboratory to GMP QA site manager in Life... Read More →

Chairs
OP

Oliver Peter, Ph.D.

Group Leader Biology Technologies and Lead Discovery, IDORSIA Pharmaceuticals Ltd


Monday March 16, 2020 10:55am - 11:15am
Room Saphir

11:15am

Supply Chain Management - Sustainability in the Lab
Laboratory operations are energy and resource intensive. For some years now, awareness has been increasing and solutions such as sustainable laboratory buildings and equipment that use less energy and resources are being worked on. But what about consumables in the lab? Approximately 5.5 million tons of plastic waste are produced every year in life sciences laboratories alone, according to a study from 2015. This includes items like pipette tips, nitrile gloves, cell culture flasks, etc. . Which opportunities do scientists have to reduce plastic consumption without jeopardizing the results of their experiments? In addition, a closer look will be taken at the supply chain and the question discussed where improvements could be achieved.

Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Hermuth-Kleinschmidt, Ph.D.

Kerstin Hermuth-Kleinschmidt, Ph.D.

Owner, NIUB Nachhaltigkeitsberatung
Kerstin Hermuth-Kleinschmidt holds a PhD in chemistry. After several years in the life sciences industry as account manager and in technical customer support, she turned her attention to the topic of sustainability and obtained an additional qualification in the field of "Environmental... Read More →

Chairs
OP

Oliver Peter, Ph.D.

Group Leader Biology Technologies and Lead Discovery, IDORSIA Pharmaceuticals Ltd


Monday March 16, 2020 11:15am - 11:35am
Room Saphir

11:35am

Supply Chain Management - Group Leader Biology Technologies and Lead Discovery
Developing products of any kind often happens in iterative cycles. For example, small molecule drugs emerge from numerous cycles of Lead Optimization, looping many times through molecule design, synthesis, and bio-activity measurements. Automating this cycle could significantly accelerate this cycle, hence there is an increasing drive to build platforms to this end. At a recent workshop on Closed-Loop Make-Test-Design Platforms for Drug Discovery and Lead Optimization, the task to efficiently feed such platforms with chemical building blocks was identified as a challenge. The principles of such Closed-Loop platforms will be introduced, and the sample management specific questions discussed.

Chairs
OP

Oliver Peter, Ph.D.

Group Leader Biology Technologies and Lead Discovery, IDORSIA Pharmaceuticals Ltd


Monday March 16, 2020 11:35am - 11:55am
Room Saphir

11:55am

12:05pm

12:10pm

Vendor Snapshot - Scigilian
Monday March 16, 2020 12:10pm - 12:15pm
Room Saphir

12:15pm

Lunch in Exhibition
Monday March 16, 2020 12:15pm - 2:00pm
Foyer

1:00pm

Poster Presentation- A General Communication Protocol for the Chemspeed ASW 2000P
Parallel synthesizers and other automation equipment are not typically used in academic organic chemistry (except for a few examples, e.g. Aggarwal, Bristol), presumably because of their high acquisition and running costs. Moreover, even if such a device is present in an organic chemistry institute, it may still not be used due to insufficient knowledge of the area. A high “energy barrier” to invest resources in such a project is often present, when said time and money could instead be invested in traditional (i.e. manual), paper-generating synthesis projects.

In the ‘AG Automation’ we aim to take on such a case in our own institute, namely a previously donated Chemspeed ASW 2000P found in the institute’s basement after 7 years of idle time. To further enhance the parallel synthesizer’s capabilities, we decided to develop a general communication protocol based on the Arduino microcontroller framework in combination with the Python scripting language. Here we present an inexpensive tool for controlling custom photoreactor arrays, MPLC/HPLC devices, email notifications and more directly from the ASW 2000P’s application menu.

Speakers
RG

Robert Gathy, M.Sc.

Doctoral Student, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover
Robert Gathy obtained his M.Sc. degree in the group of Butenschön in Hannover in the field of organometallic catalysis. He currently continues his studies as a doctoral student in the same group. His main interests lie in developing and applying automated methods to modern academic... Read More →


Monday March 16, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Foyer

1:00pm

Poster Presentation- Development of Automated Flow Screening Setups in Less Funded Laboratories
Flow chemistry has been a prolific subject to automation in the past. In principle, pumps, heating elements, solvent switchers and sample collectors are easy to obtain. However, modern, sophisticated solutions are often too expensive for laboratories with their main focus on other, less technical areas of research. Older equipment on the other hand usually does not include a trivial, user-friendly interface suited for automation.

In our student interest group ‘AG Automation’ we focus on resource exhaustion, using older laboratory equipment that would otherwise not be utilized but held as inventory, and in the worst case even be disposed of. Here we present a setup that has been programmed with LabVIEW to replace a lab worker in heterogeneous catalyst screening for the synthesis of the important fragrance ISO E Super and its derivatives.

Speakers
AS

Alexey Stepanyuk, M.Sc.

Ph.D. Student, Leibniz Universität Hannover
I have studied B. Sc. Biochemistry and M. Sc. Medicinal and Natural Product Chemistry in Hannover. In my Master's Thesis I developed improvements for our current workflow in the "Institut für Organische Chemie" with my colleague Robert Gathy. Taking unutilized equipment we could... Read More →


Monday March 16, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Foyer

1:00pm

Poster Presentation- Managed Chemical Compound Collection Enabling Drug Discovery Research at the University of Nottingham
The University of Nottingham made a major investment in the establishment of a fully automated and integrated Managed Chemical Compound Collection (MCCC), this facility provides a screening resource for the identification of chemical starting points as drug leads against newly identified and validated drug targets. The MCCC library is a chemically diverse set of approx. 85K compounds mainly sourced from external vendors with a growing collection of in-house compounds. The facility is underpinned by industry standard automation equipment and compound management software which enables low, medium and high throughput screening of biochemical and cell-based assays. Since its inception the MCCC has enabled multiple large grant awards as well as supported many pilot and proof-of-concept screening projects. The aim for the MCCC is to provide an efficient and diverse compound screening resource for researchers at the University, as well as partners in academia and industry.

Speakers
LH

Lunba Hashmi, M.Sc. Medicinal Chemistry

Compound Management Scientist, University of Nottingham
I am a Compound Management Scientist with over 18 years of experience gained in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. I was part of the Compound Management Group Charnwood at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals for 11 years where I was responsible for several key compound management areas... Read More →


Monday March 16, 2020 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Foyer

2:00pm

Interactive Session
This open discussion will address your topics about career development and the evolving role of sample management in research organisations.The interactive session is a great opportunity to pick up the topics that you are interested in, and discuss them with the expert panel and the whole audience. Use this opportunity to put your interests on the agenda!


Monday March 16, 2020 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Room Saphir

3:00pm

Coffee Break in Exhibition
Monday March 16, 2020 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Foyer

3:30pm

Vendor Snapshot - Mcule
Monday March 16, 2020 3:30pm - 3:35pm
Room Saphir

3:35pm

Vendor Snapshot - Quattro
Monday March 16, 2020 3:35pm - 3:40pm
Room Saphir

3:40pm

Collections - State-of-the-Art Sample Management in Biopharma Research to Support Automated Analytical Systems
In the last century automation has been well established in traditional industries such as car industry, food industry and many others. Drug discovery lags behind in terms of digitalization and automation. Pharmaceutical industries are beginning to catch up, some processes in the small molecular world are already automatized and the first success cases are being observed within biopharmaceuticals. In pharma Research and Early development at Roche further steps towards digitalization were done by implementing structured sample names, aligned databases, standards (e.g. body structures via HELM Sketch, SILA technology ), registration and requesting tools, as well as automated workstreams to support design, cell culture fermentation, purification and finally analytics. The combination of automation and digitalization will reduce hand on time for sample management, mainly supported by aliquotation robots, centralized sample order tools and automatized freezers. This will lead to an increase in through put and better standardization in analytics between experiments.

Speakers
AK

Alexander Knaupp, Dipl. Ing.

Project Leader Automation, Roche Diagnostics GmbH Deutschland

Chairs

Monday March 16, 2020 3:40pm - 4:00pm
Room Saphir

4:00pm

Collections
Due to the rise of novel technologies in drug discovery, sample collections beyond the classical pharmaceutical or academic standard, small molecules are gaining increasing attention. Management of bio-molecules such as antibodies, peptides or nucleic acids, as well as  collections for alternative therapeutic approaches such as DNA encoded libraries, PROTACs, or natural products, requires tailored operating procedures which are less well standardised. In this session, speakers from academia and industry will present case studies about management of such non standard sample collections.

Speakers
avatar for Jeanette Andersen, Ph.D.

Jeanette Andersen, Ph.D.

Professor, UiT- The Arctic University of Norway
Jeanette Hammer Andersen is a professor in marine bioprospecting at UiT- The Arctic University ofNorway and head of the natural products platform Marbio at UiT. Her research interest and focus is the discovery of novel bioactive compounds from the marine environment. Marbio has experience... Read More →

Chairs

Monday March 16, 2020 4:00pm - 4:20pm
Room Saphir

4:20pm

Collections - Design and Production of the Novartis’ Next Generation Screening Deck

The presentation is about the story of the design of our new screening deck (~1.4 millions of compounds) for diversity driven sub-set and iterative screening as well as what it needs to make it available for screening across the three screening research sites of NIBR.

The production of the new 384-source plates as well as the 1536-copies occurred from June to October 2019. The previous plates made during a former screening deck campaign in 2015 were getting near end of their lifecycle. All solutions were re-assembled using different criteria and a new performing deck design developed by a team of cross-functional experts. The new production includes as well compounds added since 2015.

Therefore, the presentation also offers an overview of our Compound Management facilities from our storage systems (Tube Store and Plate Store) to one of our unique and high performing liquid handling platform named HTP (High Throughput Plating system).

Speakers
HM

Hervé Mees, M.S.

Scientist, Novartis AG
In 2002, I obtained a degree of Chemical Engineer at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie of Mulhouse as well as a Master degree in Chemistry at the Université de Haute-Alsace in Mulhouse (France).In September 2002, I joined a freshly created startup company named Solidago Therapeomic... Read More →

Chairs

Monday March 16, 2020 4:20pm - 4:40pm
Room Saphir

4:40pm

Collections - Building on the Past and Preparing the Future: Compound Logistics Supporting Screening at Roche pRED
This presentation will show selected Compound Management and Screening technology developments at Roche and will put ongoing and future activities in that perspective. The focus will be on the support of uHTS activities through the development of new workflows for the production of 1536-w echo compatible source plates and new strategic approaches to screening like iterative focused screening. An additional topic presented here will be on the selection of vendors for the sourcing of screening compounds and the use of optimized logistics processes for expanding usable chemical space.


Speakers
avatar for Nicolas Zorn, Ph.D.

Nicolas Zorn, Ph.D.

Head, Compound Library Enhancement and Logistics, Hoffmann-La Roche
Nicolas Zorn is an Organic Chemist by training (Ph.D. at the University of Paris 6) and has worked for 10 years in several disease areas as medicinal chemist and computational chemist at Merck MDS in the USA, then Roche in Switzerland. In the last two years, he has led the Compound... Read More →

Chairs

Monday March 16, 2020 4:40pm - 5:00pm
Room Saphir

5:30pm

Networking Reception
Monday March 16, 2020 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Offsite
 
Tuesday, March 17
 

9:15am

Registration Open
Tuesday March 17, 2020 9:15am - 3:00pm
Foyer

9:30am

Welcome Coffee in Exhibition
Tuesday March 17, 2020 9:30am - 10:00am
Foyer

10:00am

Data - A Short Story of Using Blockchain to Exchange Samples and Related Data
Our journey begins historically, explaining the underlying reason why blockchain technology was invented in the first place.

This will lead us to the different trust models that are used and also to the question why blockchain applies a particular trust-model.

Then we will have a short introduction into the blockchain technology and showcase an example of how blockchain can be used to exchange samples and related data.

Speakers
avatar for Lorenz Sommer, M.Comp.Sc.

Lorenz Sommer, M.Comp.Sc.

Senior Consultant, Wega Informatik
Lorenz Sommer is a digital native who commenced a career in life science informatics 16 years ago. Over time he worked for many clients in different roles e.g. software developer, solution architect, business analyst, and project manager using the latest technologies on the market.One... Read More →

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 10:00am - 10:20am
Room Saphir

10:20am

Data
We have undoubtedly entered an era where data and software rule. New concepts such as the block-chain appear to have disruptive potential. In this session we will discuss what this means for Sample Management. Can we expect an evolution, or should we brace for revolution?

Speakers
Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 10:20am - 10:40am
Room Saphir

10:40am

Data
We have undoubtedly entered an era where data and software rule. New concepts such as the block-chain appear to have disruptive potential. In this session we will discuss what this means for Sample Management. Can we expect an evolution, or should we brace for revolution?

Speakers
Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 10:40am - 11:00am
Room Saphir

11:00am

Data - Advanced Integrated Approach for Data and Sample Management in Academia
"CZ-OPENSCREEN: National infrastructure for Chemical Biology” operates the state-of-art infrastructure for basic and applied research in the field of chemical biology and genetics. The Compound management (CM) department handles chemical libraries which contain more than 100,000 unique chemical compounds from various commercial and private sources. Laboratory automation is used on regular basis to effectively store and process the extensive number of samples.

At the CZ-OPENSCREEN we use our in-house developed web-based LIMS SW solution ScreenX which provides a comprehensive set of functionalities necessary for the execution of CM pipelines. ScreenX is used to store and handle all sample, experiment and instrument data, and allows their processing by multiple users with various roles and access rights levels (admin, project leader, screener, chemist, etc). Typical CM workflow starts with the input/import of the sample data in the database, realized by either manual entry or by the import of data files in CSV format. Large data files obtained from the suppliers are transformed into the importable format by employing external KNIME workflows. KNIME analytical platform SW is equipped with open cheminformatics plugins such as OpenBabel, RDKit, ChemAxon / Infocom, etc. which can be used for interconversion between different chemical structures’ notations. Integrity of the inventory data within the ScreenX is assured by using unique identifiers for each DB entry together with physical barcoding of all the labware and samples. ScreenX enables to design and execute routine CM procedures such as reformatting, cherrypicking, diluting, quality control (QC), etc. and to generate lists of instructions for the automation platforms to perform the procedures. Post-run feedback from the automation is realized by the import of the labware reports and log files into the ScreenX. CM works in close cooperation with the SW development team and serves as both the end user and beta tester entity of the ScreenX. The user feedback and new function requests are realized via JIRA-based tracking environment.

 To achieve even more effective CM and data processing pipelines, we’ve developed some dedicated standalone SW tools, such as PROBES & DRUGS portal, RackScanner, PrintServer, or InCHlib. These are used for working with the current bioactive compound space, scanning 2D-barcoded tubes/racks, remote barcode printing directly from the ScreenX, and interactive heatmap clustering and visualization (in respective order). We offer such tools as open-source projects for the scientific community.

Speakers
MP

Martin Popr, RNDr., Ph.D.

Head of Compound Management at CZ-OPENSCREEN, Institute of Molecular Genetics of the Czech Academy of Sciences
Martin Popr studied at Charles University in Prague and received his master’s degree in analytical chemistry and toxicology. He finished a Ph.D. programme in organic chemistry in 2016 by defending his thesis on Synthesis of cyclodextrin derivatives for practical applications. Since... Read More →

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 11:00am - 11:20am
Room Saphir

11:30am

Vendor Snapshots
Tuesday March 17, 2020 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room Saphir

12:00pm

Lunch in Exhibition
Tuesday March 17, 2020 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Foyer

1:00pm

Vendor Snapshots
Tuesday March 17, 2020 1:00pm - 1:10pm
Room Saphir

1:10pm

Robots - Optimization of Nucleic Acid and Protein Sample Management to Empower Research
The discovery and production of biologic therapeutics is an ever-expanding frontier in the biotech/pharmaceutical sector. As a result, the need has arisen to develop efficient and robust means of managing biomolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins, and to address some of the unique challenges they present to the sample management community. These two categories of reagents are particularly relevant because nucleic acids are foundational for the production of suitable protein/antibody drug candidates and the protein reagents needed to support the drug discovery pipeline. When managed across individual labs, potential can exist for these important research samples to be unavailable for use in the broader organization or to be discarded due to unknown or compromised sample identity, integrity and/or location.

This talk will highlight workflow optimization strategies, including automation and bioinformatics, employed in Genentech’s BioMolecular Resources Sample Management facility that enable us to empower research by providing an efficient means to receive, store, produce, track and distribute these materials. We will focus on our ongoing efforts to develop new high-throughput automated processes for sample pooling to support large and small scale protein expression workflows and other research applications. We will also share our future vision for a state-of-the-art nucleic acid and protein sample management facility and the current challenges associated with implementation of this vision.

Speakers
KN

Kristen Nailor, B.S.

Scientific Manager/Group Leader Biologics Sample Management, Genentech, Inc.
Kristen Nailor holds a degree in Biochemistry from Indiana University. She spent 7 years as a medicinal chemist at GlaxoSmithKline. She then accepted a position as the head of compound management at Vanderbilt University where she built a robust compound management facility that supported... Read More →

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 1:10pm - 1:30pm
Room Saphir

1:30pm

Robots - Robotic Assistance Tools of the Future
Historically, laboratory automation was used mostly to scale up repetitive tasks. Recent developments make it possible to expand the scope of automation and digital laboratory solutions to encompass more complex processes, peripheral work and experimental design and execution. Here, we consider how device, augmented and digital innovations could impact the way we work.

Speakers
AT

Andreas Traube

Department Manager, Fraunhofer IPA
-Studied Mechanical Engieering-Since 2005 working for Fraunhofer, focussing on automation of life science workflows and processes-Multiple projects in lab automation (cell culture, molecular biology, diagnostics, screening)-Co- inventor of I-DOT dispensing technology-Co-founder of... Read More →

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 1:30pm - 1:50pm
Room Saphir

1:50pm

Robots - Innovative Tube and Dispensing Technologies Enable Fully Acoustic Workflows for Drug Discovery Assays
Innovative design and deployment of novel labware, instrumentation and software technologies have delivered an automated, fully acoustic platform and a step-change in small molecule Sample Management (SM) processes.

For many years, conventional SM workflows have included multiple sample transfers between vessels, using a hybrid of contact and non-contact dispensing, which are cumulatively wasteful. These combine to affect excessive sample consumption, necessitating chemists to synthesise superfluous quantities of compound.

Here we show high quality concordant datasets from the first fully acoustic workflow for physico-chemical, enzymatic, cellular and in vitro ADME assays. We also show a reduction in (i) sample usage in these assays, (ii) DMSO usage throughout the process, and (iii) future synthesis requirements.

An acoustically compatible storage tube (FluidX™ AcoustiX™ Sample Tubes, Brooks Life Sciences, UK) was designed with optimum geometry for dispensing accuracy and speed, whilst maintaining a working sample volume able to sustain a 10-year screening lifetime. Co-moulded capping technology for these tubes has resulted in increased durability for multiple dispense access and sample longevity, whilst a novel split barcode at the base affords a central opening for transmission of the acoustic pulse.

A tube-compatible acoustic liquid handler (Echo® 655T Liquid Handler, Beckman Coulter Life Sciences, USA) has been designed to utilise acoustically compatible storage tubes including a faster drop-transfer rate via a new transducer-focussing mechanism. A new dryer system removes moisture on the exterior of the tube, alongside local humidity control in the drop-transfer zone to maintain sample integrity.

 The development of a new, fully acoustic workflow has minimised sample handling and waste, enabling miniaturisation of assays and hence reducing the amounts of sample required for synthesis to support drug discovery projects. We have implemented and validated novel labware and instruments for a transformative and sustainable solution to many drug discovery issues applicable across the industry.

Speakers
avatar for Silvio Di Castro, M.Sc., Chemical Engineering

Silvio Di Castro, M.Sc., Chemical Engineering

Associate Principal Scientist, AstraZeneca
A chemical engineer by training, Silvio joined Compound Management at AstraZeneca in 2002. During the time at AZ, Silvio has developed a deep expertise in laboratory automation, from programming simple benchtop units to developing large automated platforms for high-throughput screening... Read More →

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 1:50pm - 2:10pm
Room Saphir

2:10pm

Robots - Trends in Screening Tactics Deployed for Hit Identification and Implications for Sample Management
Increasing success rates and decreasing cycle times are key objectives in the pharmaceutical industry. As such, screening platforms deployed to identify starting points for chemistry are constantly evolving to meet this challenge. Traditionally, Ultra High Throughput Screening of millions of compounds in 1536 well plates, and the sample management infrastructure which accompanies that, have been the cornerstone of hit identification in pharma, and have been used to successfully identify quality starting points for numerous projects. In the past decade, other technologies such as DNA Encoded Library Screening and Affinity Selection Mass Spectrometry have emerged, which reduce the requirement for extensive assay development and enable rapid identification of binders to the target of interest, often for multiple targets in parallel. Additionally, there has been an increase in the use of human disease relevant cell systems in early discovery with the aim of identifying molecules with improved clinical translation. However, the costs, the complexity of biology, and especially the limited scalability of cells, limit how these can be used at a scale compatible with high-throughput plate-based HTS formats.         Here we will discuss how the screening platforms described above are being deployed at GSK, and the interplay between those screening platforms and the sample management infrastructure that they critically depend on. We will discuss the challenges, and opportunities for sample management in the context of this evolving screening landscape.

Speakers
ML

Melanie Leveridge, BSc. hons

Director Screening and Sample Management, GlaxoSmithKline
Melanie is the Director of Screening Profiling and Mechanistic Biology at GSK, based in Stevenage, UK and has recently also taken accountability for the global small molecule Sample Management teams in the UK and US. Melanie has been with GSK since 2005 and in this time has held roles... Read More →

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 2:10pm - 2:30pm
Room Saphir

2:30pm

Robots - The CompuGene Robotic Platform for Synthetic Biology
The CompuGene robotics platform was designed to automate DNA assembly and characterization of microbial cell factories. These capabilities will be presented in the framework of research currently being conducted by the kabisch-lab. These examples include managing of robotic protocols using git, a simple active-learning approach to characterize molecular switches, an open-source colony picking solution and the optimization of growth parameters for various applications.

Speakers
avatar for Johannes Kabisch, Ph.D.

Johannes Kabisch, Ph.D.

Professor, Technische Universität Darmstadt
PhD in Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Uni GreifswaldResearch Group leader "Drop-in Biofuels", Uni GreifswaldJunior-Professor Computer-aided Synthetic Biology, TU Darmstadt

Chairs

Tuesday March 17, 2020 2:30pm - 2:50pm
Room Saphir

2:50pm